Process art and tape resist

There are a myriad of benefits to letting young children create via process art, and my reason for encouraging Child 1 — and Child 2, when I get it together enough to make her some edible finger paints — to experience process art is it makes her happy.

Our process art materials: poster paint, copier paper, masking tape, recycled cardboard scraper, cotton buds, balloon, paintbrush, cotton balls, and clothes pegs
Our process art materials: poster paint, copier paper, masking tape, recycled cardboard scraper, cotton buds, balloon, paintbrush, cotton balls, and clothes pegs
To begin, I used masking tape to create a border and a random geometric design, then Child 1 started with a clothes peg-cotton ball combination
To begin, I used masking tape to create a border and a random geometric design, then Child 1 started with a clothes peg-cotton ball combination
Using cotton buds and a piece of recycled cardboard to scrape paint across the paper
Using cotton buds and a piece of recycled cardboard to scrape paint across the paper
Using cotton buds and a piece of recycled cardboard to scrape paint across the paper
Finally, a balloon was painted and used as a stamper
Finally, a balloon was painted and used as a stamper

For us, it’s the best way to wind Child 1 down if she’s been over-stimulated, she loves paint that much — your mileage may vary (some kids don’t like getting their hands dirty).

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